It’s bug hunt time.

It’s time to dig out that can of RAID and get bug hunting again. Lloyd suggested another bug hunt on the wp-testers list and Ryan has suggested a time 01:00 UTC on August 30th 2006 (Although due to work commitments it likely I won’t make the Bug Hunt until 17 hours later :-(). For more information about the bug hunt process you can read the questions and answers section of the WordPress Bug Hunts page on the codex.

If you need some help in understanding the process of using subversion to access the WordPress code and applying or making patches then I suggest you read through one of the few articles about working on WordPress – Specifically there are Marks’s instructions for working on MAC OS X or Linux and my instructions for working with Tortoise SVN on Windows.

So what bugs are we hunting this time? Well my personal preference would be for people to work through the lists of Has Patch tickets, i.e. those which someone has coded a fix for, and test the patches against the current trunk code adding bg|tested and/or bg|commit to the keywords for the ticket so as to show that the patch works as described and is ready for commit to the WordPress code. After all we have far too many patches, 187 at present, sitting there that either need committing or rejecting.

Hopefully then Ryan can work through the list of Commit Candidate tickets committing them to the code :-).

Tags:

6 Responses to “It’s bug hunt time.”

  1. Lloyd D Budd says:

    What does “bg|tested” and “bg|commit” mean? As opposed to just “tested” and commit”?

    Is there a document that defines the common tags used in WP Trac?

  2. […] There are about 10 people in the #wordpress-bugs IRC channel. It is a shame that more software testers and developers, amateur or professional are not taking advantage of learning from and working with such talented people on such great software. I guess it is still early in the 24 hr hunt. […]

  3. westi says:

    bg|tested an bg|commit are just the original way that the bug gardeners were adding information to the keywords fields to help populate the different views. The searches for the views were changed a while ago to support either the old style or the new style markings.

    I don’t know of any documentation that details the tags commonly used on the WordPress Trac

  4. Lloyd D Budd says:

    Ah yes, “bug gardners”. Matt’s love for “gardners” — I enjoy knowledge gardners too. It is funny that bug gardner is not mentioned anywhere in the codex.

    Who are the BGs?

  5. westi says:

    The original “bug gardeners” were skippy, morydd, and markjaquith they all have maximum privs on trac. But in general anyone who works on the WordPress trac adding patches, testing patches etc could be classed as a bug gardener. See also the WordPress Responsibilites page on the codex

  6. […] Well last weeks bug hunt went well by all accounts we managed to convince Ryan to make 30 commits and about 100 tickets were closed. During the process of testing all these patches I found a new favourite one-liner for working with trac and patches: svn revert -R * && curl “trac-patch-raw-fileurl” | patch -p0 […]



d
go to dashboard
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
e
edit post/page
r
comment on post/page
m
go to moderate comments
esc
cancel
%d bloggers like this: